The newly elected Pope Francis has celebrated his inaugural mass by placing the poor at the centre of his papacy, presaged earlier by the inspiration of St Francis of Assisi when choosing his regnal name and the urging of a fellow cardinal to “remember the poor” immediately upon his “victory” in the Sistine Chapel.

There are three questions one is tempted to ask any public person who bleats on incessantly about the poor:

1. What is the definition of poverty?

2. What is its cause?

3. What can be done about it?

Let us be charitable and ignore the fact that many measures of poverty are determined relatively (and hence are really a disguised measurement of “inequality” rather than of poverty) and proceed to answer the second two questions firmly and starkly. Poverty, to the extent that it exists, only does so because of a relative lack of production per capita of the population that is poor. This, in turn, is because there is a low amount of capital invested per person. The only way to resolve poverty is to encourage private saving, private investment in capital and an increase in production per head of the population, all of which must in turn be based upon strong rights to private property. There is absolutely no other way. Taxation, redistribution, borrowing, wasting, Government boondoggles will in no way help the poor. And yet precisely what is it that is always called for? Always the latter. Nor will the poor be helped by “showing loving concern for each and every person, especially children, the elderly, those in need, who are often the last we think about”, to quote the Pope’s inaugural homily. As economics teaches us you do not need to love your fellow human in order to increase his well-being, merely to serve him and engage in trade with him.

It would be an inspiration indeed if the Pope was to call for private property, free trade and free enterprise to lift the poor out of the slums. But I, for one, do not remain particularly hopeful that he will follow this path.

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